Past Workshops

Past Workshops

brillianceYour congregational identity is shaped by the traditions and practices in your worship gatherings. These gatherings can be especially meaningful when you combine the best of traditions handed down to you and the unique creativity of your gathered community.

Join musicians and songwriters David Gungor and John Arndt as they help you explore different approaches to using creativity and imagination in…


sueJoin Center for Congregations staff for a preview of the upcoming event The Art of the Flourishing Congregation: Practices that Promote Positive Change. This short, interactive session also includes an overview of Center for Congregations services and showcases our online resource tool, the Congregational Resource Guide (CRG).

The Art of the Flourishing…


shellieYou’re invited to two open house celebrations! 

Join us in welcoming our new Center for Congregations regional office directors - McKenzie Scott Lewis of the northwest office and Shellie Riggs Jordan of the southeast office. You'll meet Shellie at the open house in Seymour and McKenzie at the Crown Point open house.

The open houses are:

Southeast Open House
Thursday,…


MTWe have greater awareness of our neighbors than ever before. This awareness includes the present reality of great division across racial and ethnic lines. Your congregation can play a key role in creating safe space to have difficult conversations about racial inequities. You can help lead the way in moving our culture toward collective action to achieve a fairer and more just society.
 
Dr.…


pbhThe bonds of our shared faith and community grow stronger when we sing together. Paperless singing is an inclusive, oral tradition practice that invites engagement of the whole person. 

Because we aren’t holding paper music or looking at a screen, we can listen and connect more deeply to those around us, and we are free to embody the song and celebrate the beauty we co-create together.  It not only…


jsYou’ve heard the grim statistics about millennials and congregations. “Religious nones” or the religiously unaffiliated are the fastest growing in American religious demographics. Three-fourths of those who are unaffiliated are people who grew up in congregations. Some current research indicates that one million young people will leave congregational life each year for the next 30 years.


JMWe all encounter those who are grieving, whether they are part of our congregation or our community. Grief is challenging, because we often don’t feel equipped to support those in the midst of it. You're invited to join counselor, coach and consultant Jane Munk as she educates and encourages deeper practices of supporting the grieving in your communities.

Supporting someone who is grieving requires a certain “…


MikeWhile Americans remain deeply spiritual, they’re leaving congregational life behind. This is especially true of Millennials – about 1 in 10 regularly attend a congregational worship service.

Surveys report that young people feel more isolated and lonely today than at any other point in modern history. Your congregation can offer valuable connection to these young adults, but only if you are willing to…