Youth Ministry that Makes a Difference

Youth Ministry that Makes a Difference

These resources are recommended by Terrance Bridges, workshop presenter and Center staffer.  Bridges facilitated this workshop in May 2017. For more resources, contact the Center at 866-307-2381 or check out the Congregational Resource Guide at http://thecrg.org/.

Clark, Chap (Ed). Youth Ministry in the 21st Century: Five Views (Youth, Family, and Culture).  Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2015.
A synopsis of five major views of youth ministry in modern congregations, this book also provides feedback on each view from the proponents of the other views of youth ministry.  This book provides valuable insight into guiding principles that can help develop one’s personal philosophy and practice in youth ministry.

DeVries, Mark. Sustainable Youth Ministry.  Downer’s Grove, IL: IVP Books, 2008.
This is a resource that identifies some of the reoccurring themes that create pitfalls in youth ministry settings. Youth ministry expert Mark DeVries talks about principles and patterns in constructing healthy and sustainable youth ministry. The book deals directly with the issue of burnout and finding ideal mentors, models and ministers to be involved in the life of the congregation as it relates to youth ministry.  This resource helps establish and communicate realistic expectations for youth pastors, build strong volunteer teams, and it offers creative solutions for creating and keeping boundaries in one’s vocational ministry setting. 

Root, Andrew. Relationships Unfiltered: Help for Youth Workers, Volunteers, and Parents on Creating Authentic Relationships. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2009.
This book can aid youth workers, parents and volunteers in creating a paradigm shift in youth ministry to help build meaningful relationships that are not based upon results in programming, but true mentorship and impacting change in the lives of youth. The author shares both his successes and failures in building meaningful relationships in ministry and doing life together with youth. Root explores relational and incarnational ministry through the lens of place sharing.  This book is not only valuable for youth workers and parents, but also for congregational leaders and those involved in building the culture of community within the local congregation.